Fishing Vibes: Lifting The Lid On This Exciting Way To Fish

The technique of vibing has become increasingly popular due to the simple reason that it is highly effective at fooling fish. The technique of dropping down a fish pattern into submerged structure and ripping it either slowly or at pace off the bottom has proven to be deadly on a number of species.

For those who have yet to try fishing with vibes, it can be quite daunting as it requires a bit more strategic thinking than your usual lure fishing efforts. The following feature will hopefully provide a few handy hints on how to get your vibe on and get those good vibrations happening in your boat.
he vibe has been deadly on barra due to its heavy vibrations which is quickly picked up dur to their pronounced lateral line.

he vibe has been deadly on barra due to its heavy vibrations which is quickly picked up dur to their pronounced lateral line.

When To Use A Vibe

  The biggest factor when determining when to vibe is the behaviour and holding pattern of the fish you are targeting. Vibing is the best option when targeting fish that are feeding in deeper water. Whilst your typical soft plastics and hard body lures can fish this strike zone around submerged fish holding structure, vibes have the ability to stay in the strike zone much longer as they are fished on a vertical cast and retrieve. Find a big snag in open water and the ability to put a vibrating lure right on the spot and keep it there moving up and down sending pulsating waves of imitating distress is such a better option than hopping back a softy or swimming a hard body over the structure back to the boat. Vibes just hold in the structure so much better and can really get the attention of those hard to fool fish as they get plenty of time to size up your lure and attack.  

Mid-Water Vibing

That’s not to say you can’t fish vibes when fish are holding in mid water and all it takes is a change in retrieve and you are in the game. In fact this is another factor I love about the vibe as it allows you to fish all parts of the water column using the same action. It is just a matter of being able to determine where the fish are holding and getting your vibe wafting and ripping in the ideal water depth to get that strike. In fact my first vibing experience came when chasing Spanish and spotted mackerel which were holding mid water column and playing hard to get on the usual high speed metal retrieve. Changing to the vibes allowed us to drop the presentation down mid water to where the fish were swimming and using small pulsing rips to get the vibes to vibrate which saw immediate hook ups. 
The vibe is a very versatile lure which can bring results in multiple situations which makes them such a go too lure.
Coral trout also love vibes as their rattles and vibrations can attract their curiousness.

Coral trout also love vibes as their rattles and vibrations often attract this curious species.

 


Vibe Varieties

  Like most lures there are multiple types of vibes available to the angler. These include hard body vibes, semi hard bodies vibes and soft plastic vibes. All will work in most situations though some have advantages over others. When it comes to hard body vibes the biggest advantage comes from the extra noise they tend to make compared to soft vibes. Hard body vibes due to their harder exoskeleton tend to vibrate through the water much louder compared to their softer cousins. They also tend to incorporate rattles to enhance this quality even further.
Big flathead love a slow worked vibe too much attraction can scare them off.

Big flathead love a slow worked vibe too much attraction can scare them off.

 

Vibration & Sound

Vibration and sound play a big part in the attraction of vibes so this feature can be very handy especially when the water is dirty and the lures are hard to see. It is this very reason that vibes have become popular on fish species such as threadfin salmon and barramundi in the creeks.   Both fish love to feed in dirty muddy waters and use their lateral lines and threadlike whiskers to feel about bait schools. In the deeper blue water, this rattle can be devastating on hard feeding pelagics like queenfish and mackerel which will hone in on the sound of a rattling lure a mile away. Soft vibes on the other hand will utilise a different form of attraction.
Queenfish are a sucker for vibes in deep water.

Queenfish are a sucker for vibes in deep water.

‘Calling All Fish’

They tend to rely more heavily on the vibration imparted by the lures action through the water. This sends a vibrating pulse through the water column which is felt better along the fishes lateral lines then the rattle of an internal bead. This vibration is often imparted using a ripping action of the rod and the more aggressive the rip the heavier the vibration. Some species really respond well to heavy rips. Fish like jacks will love a heavy vibrating vibe as they see the lure as moving in on their territory and will often strike out at the noisy intruder. I also believe that the heavy rip tends to scare other forms of bait away which leaves your lure as the only bait fish offering on the snag.
Big jacks love a heavily ripped vibe.

Big jacks love a heavily ripped vibe.

Up Your Chances

This increases your chances in a big way especially if there are predatory fish around. Other species such as flat head prefer a slower more controlled lift. Too much vibration can scare them away so using slower more gentle lifts are all that is necessary. 
Semi soft vibes are a combination of both hard and soft vibes and provide the successful attributes of both types of lures. It’s a bit like having an even way punt and for this reason are very popular amongst anglers.
Threadies are suckers for vibes thanks to their large whiskers (Ryan Moody image)

Threadies are suckers for vibes thanks to their large whiskers (Ryan Moody image)

Night Fishing

One of the unsung successes of vibes is their effectiveness when fishing at night. Whilst hard body and soft plastic lures can be effective in the darker hours, the vibe really comes into its own.   The vibrating action allows predatory fish to hone in on lures is the dark and this makes them a cracker offering especially on big fish like barramundi. In both stocked freshwater impoundments and saltwater creeks, it is hard to go past a big vibrating vibe when fished at night. The fish patterns of vibes also match the hatch perfectly for many of the main bait species barra love to eat. 
The same can be said in the salt with the vibe fish pattern matching bait fish such as the sardine, herring, yellow tail and scad perfectly.  

Using your sounder


  One of the keys to successful vibing is using your sounder to find fish. If you can find good shows of bait or even better fish in deep water then vibing into them is the best way to maximise your chances of success. Vibing is very much a patience game and it’s all about using them when the situation is right. I prefer to have a rod rigged up with a vibe for those very special occasions when a big school of bait or fish appear on the sounder waiting perfectly for your vibe to drift amongst them.
Using your sounder is a must. Here you can see a good show of fish just waiting for a vibe to get amongst them.

Using your sounder is a must. Here you can see a good show of fish just waiting for a vibe to get amongst them.

Get into It

  If you haven’t given vibing a go I’d suggest you get into it. It’s a great way to diversify your fishing and to fish areas which are usually a little difficult to fish comprehensively. Whether its hard, softy or semi hard, vibes are a top option to fish on many different species.
vibe9

A top-quality barra that took a liking to one of Dan’s vibes.

   
Dan Kaggelis

About Dan Kaggelis

Born in Tully, North Queensland, Dan cut his fishing teeth in the region’s freshwater rivers chasing the tropical triumvirate of sooty grunter, jungle perch and barramundi. With fishing running thick in the Kaggelis family, Dan was fortunate to experience many extended trips to the Western Cape and Gulf of Carpentaria from a young age. This instilled a deep affection for the sport. Living so close to Great Barrier Reef, offshore fishing was also very much included in recreational activities as was free diving and spearfishing.

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